burymeinyellowhenidie:

Eartha Kitt as Catwoman

Eartha Kitt IS Catwoman

(via themarysue)

modmad:

potentialforart:

modmad:

HEY MINIONS so at the risk of you unfollowing/me sounding like a crazy person I’m going to ask you to do something very unusual today. I am going to ask you to watch a Barbie movie. (That’s it, up there. The whole thing. No really it’s like official no need to pirate it or anything how easy is that.)

WHY ON EARTH WOULD YOU DO THAT? Well okay so for one I am one of the two storyboard artists that worked on this (yes, two board artists, for a whole film, get that into your head I can hardly believe we managed it myself), but I am about to blow your mind with the more important detail that the other storyboarder was also the director and also the first female director that a Barbie film has had. Ever. Wow. I know. I knooooow.

So, tumblr, this is why Barbie and the Secret Door is important; this is the first Barbie film directed by a woman. Watch it. There is a super great villain, super cute giant purple furry minions with English accents and very bright super colourful colours all over the place just wait until you get to the magical place I stg you need sunglasses. There are also a lot of songs which will get stuck in your head and aggressive jive dancing.

I am not saying it is the best film, I am not saying that there aren’t other films that deserve your attention more, but there was a whole team of people behind this one gem of a lady trying our very best to make this film good, and you know what? I like it. There are many things that could be improved, yes, and there were decisions made by Mattel that we simply could not change whether we agreed with them or not, but that’s the case with every film, and this film saw a huge shift in the effort and direction of Barbie films. Tell Mattel what you want to see fixed, yes, but tell them that you want to see more of this; more women in control of pictures that are aimed towards young girls (because, let’s face it, these are). These films get translated into every language, they access a lot of people, these films can have influence. We need to be able to use this medium in a positive way, and we tried to, we really did try with this film. Barbie should be a positive icon for feminism; she has been before!

So, yes, please check this out if you have the time, and give Mattel and Rainmaker the feedback that they need!

I swear to god if you don’t love Romy and Nori, you are dead to me.

fun fact which nobody must tell Mattel;

I read the script and just pictured them as being a married couple so that’s how I treated the acting with them

there I said it

In the post-World War II era, the Klan experienced a huge resurgence. Its membership was skyrocketing, and its political influence was increasing, so Kennedy went undercover to infiltrate the group. By regularly attending meetings, he became privy to the organization’s secrets. But when he took the information to local authorities, they had little interest in using it. The Klan had become so powerful and intimidating that police were hesitant to build a case against them.

Struggling to make use of his findings, Kennedy approached the writers of the Superman radio serial. It was perfect timing. With the war over and the Nazis no longer a threat, the producers were looking for a new villain for Superman to fight. The KKK was a great fit for the role.

In a 16-episode series titled “Clan of the Fiery Cross,” the writers pitted the Man of Steel against the men in white hoods. As the storyline progressed, the shows exposed many of the KKK’s most guarded secrets. By revealing everything from code words to rituals, the program completely stripped the Klan of its mystique. Within two weeks of the broadcast, KKK recruitment was down to zero. And by 1948, people were showing up to Klan rallies just to mock them.

How Superman Defeated the Ku Klux Klan | Mental Floss (via sarkos)

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I ain’t the world’s best writer nor the world’s best speller
But when I believe in something I’m the loudest yeller

“Stetson Kennedy,” Woody Guthrie

(via wolfpangs)

If Woody Guthrie wrote a song about your merits, you freaking HAD them.

(via delcat)

Stetson Kennedy: American Badass.

(via underscorex)

(via minuiko)

jakewyattriot:

I apologize if this comes off as disrespectful to Michael Brown or Trayvon Martin. Or their families. Or YOU, the reader. I’m not about that. That’s not why I drew this.

I am just really freaked out that 40% of Americans (and 47% of White Americans) do not think that the killings and violence in Ferguson ‘raise any racial issues.’ Fellow White Persons, this is our chance to learn. This is our chance to change.

When Trayvon Martin was murdered because Full Grown Men in America are frightened to violence by the presence black children, the dialogue turned very quickly into a conversation about gun control.

And gun control is an issue that deserves our attention.

But it won’t change the massive poverty in Black America. The arrest rate. The education statistics. The institutional, systemic, casual, and passive racism that plagues our country.

And it wouldn’t have saved Michael Brown.

Anyway. I’m sorry if this comes off as disrespectful or insincere or preachy. I’m sorry if my execution (or personality) gets in the way of what I’m trying to say. I am an imperfect artist, an imperfect person, and I am, undoubtedly, blinded to a million things by my own glaring whiteness. So this might be… Lord, this might be awful. I’m so sorry if it’s awful. Really.

But. I just keep thinking… Look, my wife is pregnant with our first child. A boy. We’re nervous, we’re excited, we’re SO ANXIOUS because what the hell do you do with babies? WE don’t know. But if we were a black family… in this country… we would be so terrified. Because we live in a nation that murders the children of black parents, puts it on the news WITH RIOTS AND TEAR GAS as decoration, and still half of us don’t even see it as a problem. Can you imagine that? Can you imagine bringing a child into that reality, to face the odds we lay out for black kids?

That would break me. I’ve never known anything like that. No one should ever know anything like that.

So let’s talk to our friends about race. Lets talk to our families. And when actual victims of racism try to tell us what’s going on in, say, a peaceful community protest as they are being gassed and shot at by cops WE SHOULD LISTEN TO AND BELIEVE THEM. Let’s talk to each other about this until we are all on the same page.

And then let’s turn the damn page.

nateswinehart:

Being good to each other is so important, guys.

(via minuiko)

whinecraft:

when youre drawing something and it looks really good

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when you wake up the next morning and it still looks good

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(via preciousterrestrials)

octoswan:

there’s a comic book store in my town that gives ladies a 10% discount and the people who work there are really friendly so lots of ladies show up to hang out and buy comics and one time i was looking through some new releases and this guy walked in, saw all the ladies, did a double take, and said really loudly and condescendingly, ‘there sure are a lot of girls in here for a comic store!’ and laughed but no one else laughed with him and it was glorious

(via preciousterrestrials)

archiemcphee:

The leaf pictured at the top of this post isn’t a leaf at all. It’s made of paper and is an exquisite example of the Japanese art of papercutting is called Kirie (切り絵, meaning ‘cut paper’). All of the extraordinarily delicate examples of the Kirie seen here were handmade by a self-taught Japanese artist named Akira Nagaya, whose skills were first discovered about 30 years ago while he was working in a sushi shop.

"One of his first tasks was to learn sasabaran, a technique to create decorations by cutting slices into bamboo leaves. Back at home, and recalling his boss’s demonstration, Nagaya tried to practice using paper and a utility knife. He found that the technique came quite naturally, and he enjoyed doing it.”

Years later Nagaya was still making his intricate paper objects when he opened his very own restaurant and decided to display his kirie “for fun.” When a local newspaper showed up to review his restaurant they spotted his creations and encouraged him to display them in a gallery.

“That was the first time I even considered what I had been doing as art,” recalls Nagaya.

Head over to Akira Nagaya’s Facebook page to check out many more of his marvelous cut paper creations.

[via Spoon & Tamago]

(via haniemohd)